Colleges For Communication Majors Charleston SC

Communication is perhaps one of the most popular college majors not just in the country. This popularity is by no means a fluke or a fad. After all, the role of media in society today is just immense; it’s no wonder everyone wants to be part of it in various capacity.

College of Charleston
(843) 953-5500
66 George Street
Charleston, SC
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $8400
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $20418
School Information
Type of Institution : Comprehensive higher education system
Institutional Designation : Public—State

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Trident Technical College
(843) 574-6111
7000 Rivers Ave
Charleston, SC
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $3596
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $6208
School Information
Type of Institution : Two-Year college
Institutional Designation : Public—State and Local

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Citadel Military College of South Carolina
(843) 225-3294
171 Moultrie St
Charleston, SC
Tuition
$21,031.00
# of Undergrads
2172
School Information
Public
Setting
Mid-sized city

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Medical University of South Carolina
(843) 792-2300
179 Ashley Ave
Charleston, SC
# of Undergrads
250
School Information
Public
Setting
Mid-sized city

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Medical University of South Carolina
179 Ashley Ave
Charleston, SC
 
Medical University of South Carolina
(843) 792-2300
Office of Enrollment Services
Charleston, SC
School Information
Type of Institution : Upper-Level higher education institution with graduate programs
Institutional Designation : Public—State

Data Provided by:
Citadel Military College of South Carolina
171 Moultrie St
Charleston, SC
 
Trident Technical College
(843) 574-6111
7000 Rivers Avenue
Charleston, SC
Tuition
$6,308.00
# of Undergrads
5494
School Information
Public
Setting
Small city

Data Provided by:
College of Charleston
(843) 953-5500
66 George St
Charleston, SC
Tuition
$20,418.00
# of Undergrads
8988
School Information
Public
Setting
Mid-sized city

Data Provided by:
Trident Technical College
7000 Rivers Avenue
Charleston, SC
 
Data Provided by:

Colleges For Communication Majors

Communication is perhaps one of the most popular college majors not just in the country. This popularity is by no means a fluke or a fad. After all, the role of media in society today is just immense; it’s no wonder everyone wants to be part of it in various capacity. Communication majors can also expect a wide range of employment choices after their college education. Since the scope of the communication course is wide and all encompassing, a communication major can apply for jobs in all the types of media existing (radio, television, print, and even the internet). And unlike other careers where technology can reduce the usefulness of an employee, in this field, technology can only make it richer and more exciting—and even provide additional job opportunities. For sure, the field communication majors will have to face later on will be different. But that doesn’t make communication majors as professionals less needed.

Why choose communication?

So when should you consider being a communication major?

Obviously, a student needs to have strong interest in the field of media. Most communication programs cover media in general, which means one should expect subjects on television, radio, and even print. This also means the student will utilize a number of skills (such as writing, production, among others). Some colleges, however, do offer specialized programs. When considering college options, the available specialization should be thoroughly thought through.

Overall, communication majors should expect courses related to or specializing on various aspects of the media profession. While communication programs will likely cover the areas of advertising, public relations, and journalism, they also cover business management and marketing. Since the course encompasses a number of disciplines, the student should have an interest in all types of media, even if he or she plans to specialize in just one area later on. Why? Simple: there are prerequisite courses for communication majors. One can’t expect to study on just one field despite his or her specialization.

But what should communication majors expect to do, in general?

Although this should depend from one college to another, in a nutshell, communication majors should expect to thorough study of all media—history, basics, and practical skills needed, among others. All communication programs will require the students to take units on theoretical aspects of media (communication theories are among the first theoretical subjects a student will have to take regardless of specialization). This should include various media laws as well (possibly including an intensive course on the libel and defamation laws in the country). But this course goes beyond the theoretical: communication majors should expect a lot of hands on work. Besides the internship, communication majors will work on campus radio and television stations, write scripts and other media-related materials, among others. A good communication program should be composed of a good set of theoretical and practical courses.

College selection tips
Now that you know what to expect, the next consideration should be: what college should communication majors choose?

Of course, there are a number of good and even prestigious communication colleges in the country. But before you even consider that factor, you should try to look what makes these colleges better than the others.

Consider their courses and their available specializations. One of the best college options in this respect is the prestigious Annenberg School of Communications of the University of Pennsylvania. It’s one of the best in the country because it probably has one of the broadest course works among all the colleges in America. From the study and critique of the media institutions to a thorough analysis of contemporary culture and how it affects modern media, communication majors are expected to become learned media practitioners rather than just those with limited knowledge after the course. Meanwhile, the Syracuse University provides amazing specializations—from all kinds of journalism to even specialized communication niches such as photography.

Equipment, of course, is also an important part of your consideration when looking at college options. For instance, if you’re planning to specialize in broadcast journalism, the college should have an extensive and impressive range of broadcast equipment, comparable to the ones currently used in actual television stations. Some colleges will probably focus more on the theoretical rather than the actual use of the equipment. But how can anyone expect to learn how to edit or manage a station without actually doing it hands on? In this case, the communication division of the Massachusetts Institution of Technology should be a very strong choice. The college specializes on the technology side of the industry. Not only is their program commendable due to the less than tradition take on the program; the MIT also the best equipment and tools to offer comprehensive courses on their niche.

The faculty is always a great consideration as well. Communication majors should always consider colleges with a faculty comprised mostly on media practitioners. Many colleges prioritize masteral and doctorate degree holders over media professionals. While this makes them qualified to teach in the collegiate level, consider this: what are the things a non-practitioner can teach that an actual media professional can? Remember that the communication field is mainly practical work. For instance, in journalism, at the very core of the profession, you don’t really need the theories to be able to work as a writer. Of course, theoretical subjects help—they put the practical side of the profession in context. But in the end, you need someone who has been on the field and has actually done as a profession what he or she is teaching.

Location may seem like a minor consideration when working on college options, but it does play a part in your education. For instance, a theater student is better off in a New York university than somewhere in Kansas or Indiana since the Big Apple is the center of the professional center industry (read: Broadway). Likewise, a film student will reap several rewards when studying in Los Angeles since it is the moviemaking capital of the country (read: Hollywood).